Quick Answer: What Is The Difference Between Tautology And Pleonasm?

What is an example of redundancy?

An example of a redundancy is when a piece of text says the same exact thing twice.

An example of a redundancy is when machines are no longer needed because they are obsolete and have been replaced by better versions.

An example of redundancy is when people are put out-of-work because they aren’t necessary any longer..

Why do we use Hypophora?

Hypophora. … The hypophora is thus different from a rhetorical question, because it actually is meant to be answered. The main purpose of the hypophora is to enable the speaker to anticipate the listeners’ concerns and then address them within the context of his own speech.

What does Diacope mean?

Diacope (/daɪˈækoʊpi/) is a rhetorical term meaning repetition of a word or phrase with one or two intervening words. It derives from a Greek word meaning “cut in two”.

What is a sibilance in English?

Sibilance is a figure of speech in which a hissing sound is created within a group of words through the repetition of “s” sounds.

Is period of time a tautology?

Tautology is: It is important to understand that a period of time can be any length, and your premise that ‘a period of time’ repeats the meaning of extensive is incorrect. This also holds for ‘extensive amounts of time’, since amounts of time holds no indication as to the duration.

Why is tautology used?

Essentially, a tautology expresses the same thing, idea, or saying repeatedly. There are many reasons people use tautology in both everyday discussion and poetry, research papers, prose, and song lyrics. At times it may be due to inept speakers or inadequacies in a language, or intentional ambiguities .

What is the opposite of a tautology?

The exact opposite of tautology is contradiction.

What is an example of pleonasm?

For example, “I like a smuggler. He is the only honest thief.” However, pleonasm is a combination of two or more words which are more than those required for clear expression. For example, “I saw it with my own eyes.”

Is a tautology bad?

The Importance of Avoiding Tautology. Tautologies interrupt prose and conversation with unnecessary words. They also sound bad because they are a kind of mistake; it sounds like you meant to explain something, but instead you just said the same thing again, which can be confusing rather than helpful.

What is an example of a tautology?

In grammatical terms, a tautology is when you use different words to repeat the same idea. For example, the phrase, “It was adequate enough,” is a tautology. The words adequate and enough are two words that convey the same meaning.

How do I check my tautology?

If you are given any statement or argument, you can determine if it is a tautology by constructing a truth table for the statement and looking at the final column in the truth table. If all of the truth values in the final column are true, then the statement is a tautology.

What’s the opposite of Polysyndeton?

Polysyndeton has an opposite, called asyndeton (something Joe is very fond of using). Asyndeton is what would result if you replaced all the conjunctions in the sample sentence above with commas, as in the famous Julius Caesar quote, “Veni, vidi, vici.”

What is the difference between tautology and redundancy?

Redundancy refers to saying the same thing more than once, usually in different words each time. … Tautology is saying the same thing twice – but in different words.

What is Epiplexis?

Noun. epiplexis. (rhetoric) A rhetorical figure seeking to convince and move by an elegant kind of upbraiding.

What is an example of Epanalepsis?

Epanalepsis Definition. … Epanalepsis is a figure of speech in which the beginning of a clause or sentence is repeated at the end of that same clause or sentence, with words intervening. The sentence “The king is dead, long live the king!” is an example of epanalepsis.

What is an example of a chiasmus?

Chiasmus is a figure of speech in which the grammar of one phrase is inverted in the following phrase, such that two key concepts from the original phrase reappear in the second phrase in inverted order. The sentence “She has all my love; my heart belongs to her,” is an example of chiasmus.

How can tautology be prevented?

In order to avoid using tautologies, pay careful attention to the logic of what you are writing….How to Avoid TautologyRe-read and spot tautologies.Delete them, or.Change them to phrases that actually add some information to the first.

What does Epistrophe mean?

Epistrophe (Greek: ἐπιστροφή, “return”) is the repetition of the same word or words at the end of successive phrases, clauses or sentences. It is also known as epiphora and occasionally as antistrophe. It is a figure of speech and the counterpart of anaphora.